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February 8 Performance John K Sampson, Christine Fellows, Rhea Tregebov & Steven Galloway

January 22, 2013 Media contact: Laurie Townsend (604) 822-9161

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Singer-songwriters Christine Fellows and John K. Samson (of The Weakerthans) perform at UBC February 8, at 8:00 pm
Vancouver, BC ~ The UBC School of Music, in partnership with the UBC Creative Writing Program, present Winnipeg singer-songwriters Christine Fellows and John K. Samson in performance at UBC in the Roy Barnett Recital Hall on February 8, 2013. Christine Fellows and John K. Samson will be joined by poet Rhea Tregebov and novelist Steven Galloway, both UBC faculty members.  Works by all four creators will be featured in the concert. Fellows and Samson, Writers-in-residence at the UBC Creative Writing Program for 2012/13, will also participate in a roundtable discussion titled Music, Place, People: Popular Music and the Collaborative Act. The roundtable will take place on Friday February 8 at 3:15 pm in Gessler Hall (Room 116) in the Music Building at UBC.
For further details, click here.

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Vancouver is Awesome feature on Reading

Read All Over celebrates the bookworm in all of us, showcasing readers in Vancouver and the books they love most.
Rhea Tregebov is a poet, novelist and children’s writer. Born in Saskatoon and raised in Winnipeg, she spent many years in Toronto and then was lured to Vancouver eight years ago by a job in the Creative Writing Program at UBC. Her seventh collection of poetry, All Souls’,was released by Signal Editions/Véhicule Press (Montreal) in September, 2012. 

Her historical novel, The Knife-Sharpener’s Bell (Coteau Books), follows a Winnipeg family who make a reverse migration back to the Soviet Union in the 1930s. She’ll be at the Jewish Book Festival on Thursday November 29, at the Vancouver JCC.

What are you currently reading? Your thoughts on it?

I’ve just finished Linda Svendsen’s Sussex Drive, a wickedly funny Ottawa satire with a very frightening, too-close-for-comfort political message. And I’ve started Annabel Lyon’s The Sweet Girl, which features Aristotle’s daughter Pythias, and is a sequel to The Golden Mean, Lyon’s book about the philosopher. I find the way Lyon is able to enter the human mind of Classical times uncanny, unsettling, and fascinating. Since I can never read just one thing at a time, I’ve also started Rachel Rose’s new book of poetry, Song & Spectacle. I’m a long-time fan of Rose’s work, and admire as much the wisdom of how she sees the world as the technique that makes her such a skilled writer.

 

To read the whole feature, go to http://vancouverisawesome.com/2012/11/28/read-all-over-rhea-tregebov/

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Vancouver Jewish Book Fair Panel From Poetry to Prose

 


 

Thursday Nov 29 @ 6:30pm

MEET THE AUTHORS From Poetry to Prose and Back

Rhea Tregebov / All Souls’

Susan Glickman / Smooth Yarrow            

 Isa Millman / Something Small to Carry Home

Tickets: $14.00  BUY TICKETS ONLINE >>             or call 604-257-5111

Susan Glickman’s sixth collection of poetry, The Smooth Yarrow, just came out in May. According to Quill and Quire, “Glickman’s writing is defiant: like yarrow, it is lean and strong, not only beautiful, but possessed of myriad healing properties.” She is also the author of two novels for adults, The Violin Lover, which won the 2006 Canadian Jewish Fiction Award, and The Tale-Teller, which just came out this autumn, the “Lunch Bunch” series of children’s books, and a prize-winning work of literary criticism, The Picturesque & The Sublime: A Poetics of the Canadian Landscape.”

Isa Milman is a poet and visual artist who lives in Victoria, BC. Born a displaced person in Germany in 1949, she grew up in the United States and came to Canada in 1975. She’s a graduate of Tufts University, and holds a Masters of Rehabilitation Science from McGill, where she taught for a decade. She is the author of Between the Doorposts (Ekstasis Editions, 2004) and Prairie Kaddish (Coteau Books, 2008), both of which won the Canadian Jewish Book Award for poetry. Her latest collection, Something Small to Carry Home, was published by Quattro Books in April 2012.

Bluesy, opinionated, sly, self-chastising and tender, Rhea Tregebov’s All Souls’—her first collection since 2004—commands a range of tones wider and bolder than anything in her previous six books of poetry. Inspired by crises both personal (divorce, adult children, aging parents) and societal (global warming, financial implosion),All Souls’ bracingly addresses the quandary at the heart of our present moment: the fear of change and the fear of standing still. Enriched by a sharp palate and crackling with confidence, Tregebov’s new poems capture life in all its rueful aspects, and do so with a lyricism of considerable beauty and power.

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G&M Review of Eve Joseph’s The Secret Signature of Things

The poems in The Secret Signature of Things are immersed in the rich landscape of British Columbia. In the first section of the book, Menagerie, Joseph takes on the voices of 10 resident creatures, some native to B.C., some domestic. By inhabiting this variety of creatures, Joseph extends the usual limits of the lyric, allowing the reader to imaginatively enter into the point of view of the subjects of her poems – crow, carp, swallow – whose voices she assumes. Joseph employs a lean, streamlined lyric, reliant on the clarity and integrity of her images.

To read full review, go to: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/books/review-the-secret-signature-of-things-by-eve-joseph/article1714924/

Reviewed by Rhea Tregebov

Globe and Mail Update Published on  Monday, Sep. 20, 2010 12:37PM EDT

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G&M Review of Triny Finlay’s Histories Haunt Us

Triny Finlay’s second collection of poetry, Histories Haunt Us, intends to unpack past events in order to comprehend their impact on the present. Finlay’s method is delicate, elliptical. The book’s first section, New Astronomers, opens with a series of five poems examining loss in the context of the speaker’s fragile psychological state: “pills and group and pills and group and pills” (Abstract Loss, 4).

To read full review, go to: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/books/review-histories-haunt-us-by-triny-finlay/article1674454/

Reviewed by Rhea Tregebov

Globe and Mail Update Published on Monday, Aug. 16, 2010 12:28PM EDT

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G&M Review of George Sipos’s fine The Glassblowers

The Daily Review, Wed., Aug. 4

‘Out beyond the window’

George Sipos

George Sipos

George Sipos’s new collection is technically brilliant and free of the romanticizing common to poetry about nature.

Review by Rhea Tregebov: To read complete article, go to:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/books/review-the-glassblowers-by-george-sipos/article1661508/

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